december 5

Well, up with the sun today... which is a bummer because I thought I might be moving beyond the jet lag.  

view from the kitchen, this morning

view from the kitchen, this morning

Yesterday, I spent locked away in my studio so unfortunately, I don't have a ton of "Heather as the stupid American" musings to report.  So overall, that is good for me, since thus far, I've tried to give all my money away.  Don't worry, that can change as I am expecting to get out of the house today to 1. clear my head; 2. find cats; 3. find some fabric; 4. be in sun (in that order).  Reykjavik is known to be overrun with cats- my fellow residents have attested to that.  Here's to many new friends!

Getting the studio off the ground has taken a direction I had not expected.  I have a very small studio- which is fine, because I don't anticipate hands on 'making' to happen.  Getting adjusted after almost 6 months in my new job and having thought about "what I would do if I had time" nearly that entire time, creates a ton of pressure as to what I would do once I got here.  So needless to say, I felt a bit stifled.  But I went through my sketchbook, which is chock full of ramblings, and I latched onto something I wrote in the margins back in October- morse code.

Let's make one thing clear, this past year, I committed to using my body as a measure when considering the nature of 'longing.'  There is love, alienation, coping, and possible reconciliation.  I have been investigating operations on how the body is measured, how the act exemplifies emotional content, and how I can actualize the internal and ephemeral cognitive nature of our 'human-ness.' 

In months prior to this, I listed off different 'forms of measurement'- such as weight, length, volume, distance- in my sketchbook and have used the body to respond and create 'actualized longing.'  Listed as an option of measure in my sketchbook was harmonic analysis.  Yeah, I didn't know what that was either but here is the definition: a branch of mathematics concerned with the representation of functions or signals as the superposition of basic waves (thanks, wikipedia).

So that is about as exciting to me as a wet noodle.  I've never much cared for math so one can only imagine what great joy it would create for me in my studio practice, but I have always told my students that never throw anything away in the sketchbook.  One never knows what will be useful later.  With a little arrow next to harmonic analysis directed me to the related concept- morse code.  The little bit I have researched- we can thank harmonic analysis for telecommunications and space exploration.  It led me to think about the alienation longing creates- a communication from afar; maybe heard, maybe not; maybe reciprocated, maybe not.  When thinking of morse code, I sink right into thinking about ships lost at sea clicking away 'S.O.S.' hoping that someone heard them.... and I think of how we often can feel lost and we try and communicate, longing to be heard.  (Cue Bowie's Space Oddity)

Fun fact: Samuel F. B. Morse, creator of Morse code, was an American painter, living from 1791- 1872.  I never knew that!

I spent an entire day sorting this out into a little video sketch (below).  Keep in mind, I am not at all a video artist but it seems the most appropriate method to flush this out at this time. On deck today is to work on phrases that will eventually string into a grouping visual poetic phrases or gestures, along this idea.